Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/228113
Authors: 
Yang, Fan
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IES Working Paper No. 31/2020
Abstract: 
This paper reviews recent developments in empirical literature analyzing hedge fund performance. Popularity of hedge funds as an investment device has dramatically increased over the past decades. This prompted extensive academic research examining their performance. Systematic examination of hedge fund performance is plagued by the opaqueness of their operations, which complicates risk measurement, and by the lack of well-regulated systematic disclosure, which makes it difficult to obtain comprehensive bias-free data sets. Thus, various studies reach divergent conclusions about hedge funds' ability to benefit from investment managers' prowess in generating superior return. We survey this literature and classify it into several streams based on the underlying performance drivers. We compare and contrast conclusions of individual articles and conclude that even though there is little consensus on the magnitude and significance of hedge fund outperformance most published studies seem to suggest that hedge funds earn at least the excess return to cover the fees they charge. The relationship between the regulation and performance is complex but more stringent regulation seems to reduce managerial misreporting.
Subjects: 
hedge fund
literature
review
survey
JEL: 
G12
G28
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.