Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/228049
Authors: 
Asongu, Simplice
Odhiambo, Nicholas M.
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
AGDI Working Paper No. WP/20/072
Abstract: 
This research focuses on assessing how improving openness influences CO2 emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is based on 49 countries in SSA for the period 2000-2018 divided into: (i) 44 countries in SSA for the period 2000-2012; and (ii) 49 countries for the period 2006- 2018. Openness is measured in terms of trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. The empirical evidence is based on the Generalised Method of Moments. The following main findings are established. First, enhancing trade openness has a net positive impact on CO2 emissions, while increasing FDI has a net negative impact. Second, the relationship between CO2 emissions and trade is a Kuznets shape, while the nexus between CO2 emissions and FDI inflows is a U-shape. Third, a minimum trade openness (imports plus exports) threshold of 100 (% of GDP) and 200 (% of GDP) is beneficial in promoting a green economy for the first and second sample, respectively. Fourth, FDI is beneficial for the green economy below critical masses of 28.571 of Net FDI inflows (% of GDP) and 33.333 of net FDI inflows (% of GDP) for first and second samples, respectively. It follows from findings that while FDI can be effectively managed to reduce CO2 emissions, this may not be the case with trade openness because the corresponding thresholds for trade openness are closer to the maximum limit. This study complements the extant literature by providing critical masses of Trade and FDI that are relevant in promoting the green economy in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Subjects: 
CO2 emissions
Economic development
Africa
Sustainable development
JEL: 
C52
O38
O40
O55
P37
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
738.82 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.