Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/227340
Authors: 
Orlov, George
McKee, Douglas
Berry, James
Boyle, Austin
DiCiccio, Thomas J.
Ransom, Tyler
Rees-Jones, Alex
Stoye, Joerg
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13813
Abstract: 
We use standardized end-of-course knowledge assessments to examine student learning during the disruptions induced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Examining seven economics courses taught at four US R1 institutions, we find that students performed substantially worse, on average, in Spring 2020 when compared to Spring or Fall 2019. We find no evidence that the effect was driven by specific demographic groups. However, our results suggest that teaching methods that encourage active engagement, such as the use of small group activities and projects, played an important role in mitigating this negative effect. Our results point to methods for more effective online teaching as the pandemic continues.
Subjects: 
economic education
pedagogical methods
higher education
COVID-19
JEL: 
A22
I23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
472.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.