Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/227309
Authors: 
Bossavie, Laurent
Cho, Yoon Y.
Heath, Rachel
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13782
Abstract: 
After the tragic factory collapse of Rana Plaza in 2013, both the direct reforms and indirect responses of retailers have plausibly affected workers in the Ready Made Garment (RMG) sector in Bangladesh. These responses included a minimum wage increase, high profile but voluntary audits, and an increased reluctance to subcontract to smaller factories. This paper uses six rounds of the Labor Force Survey and adopts a synthetic control approach to evaluate the net effects of these changes on garment workers. While we find that working conditions did improve, we find evidence of adverse effects on several other outcomes for workers. In particular, while the reforms initially increased female workers' wages, their wages had fallen an estimated 20 percent three years after Rana Plaza. We also show suggestive evidence that female workers' contracts displayed a similar short-term increase and ultimate long-term decrease. Male workers, by contrast, if anything experienced only short-term adverse effects.
Subjects: 
garment sector
working conditions
gender
minimum wage
JEL: 
F16
J16
J31
J32
J81
O12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
629.71 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.