Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/227245
Authors: 
Oreopoulos, Philip
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13718
Publisher: 
Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
This article takes stock of where the field of behavioral science applied to education policy seems to be at, which avenues seem promising and which ones seem like dead ends. I present a curated set of studies rather than an exhaustive literature review, categorizing interventions by whether they nudge (keep options intact) or "shove" (restrict choice), and whether they apply a high or low touch (whether they use face-to-face interaction or not). Many recent attempts to test large-scale low touch nudges find precisely estimated null effects, suggesting we should not expect letters, text messages, and online exercises to serve as panaceas for addressing education policy's key challenges. Programs that impose more choice-limiting structure to a youth's routine, like mandated tutoring, or programs that nudge parents, appear more promising.
Subjects: 
behavioral economics of education
nudge
shove
JEL: 
I2
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
229.48 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.