Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/227242
Authors: 
Ahn, SangNam
Kim, Seonghoon
Koh, Kanghyock
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13715
Publisher: 
Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
The COVID–19 pandemic has challenged the capacity of healthcare systems around the world and can potentially compromise healthcare utilization and health outcomes among non-COVID–19 patients. Using monthly panel data of nationally representative middle-aged and older Singaporeans, we examined the associations of the pandemic with healthcare utilization, out-of-pocket medical costs, and perceived health. At its peak, doctor visits decreased by 30% and out-of-pocket medical spending decreased by 23%, mostly driven by reductions in inpatient and outpatient care. Although there were little changes in self-reported health and sleep quality, COVID–19 increased depressive symptoms by 4%. We argue that it is imperative to monitor COVID–19's long-term health effects among non-COVID–19 patients since our findings indicated delayed healthcare and worsened mental health during the outbreak.
Subjects: 
COVID–19
pandemic
healthcare utilization
healthcare spending
self-reported health status
mental health
JEL: 
I12
I18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
368.63 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.