Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/227147
Authors: 
Angelucci, Manuela
Angrisani, Marco
Bennett, Daniel
Kapteyn, Arie
Schaner, Simone G.
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13620
Abstract: 
This paper examines the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on employment and respiratory health for remote workers (i.e. those who can work from home) and non-remote workers in the United States. Using a large, nationally-representative, high-frequency panel dataset from March through July of 2020, we show that job losses were up to three times as large for non-remote workers. This gap is larger than the differential job losses for women, African Americans, Hispanics, or workers without college degrees. Non-remote workers also experienced relatively worse respiratory health, which likely occurred because it was more difficult for non-remote workers to protect themselves. Grouping workers by pre-pandemic household income shows that job losses and, to a lesser extent, health losses were highest among non-remote workers from low-income households, exacerbating existing disparities. Finally, we show that lifting non-essential business closures did not substantially increase employment.
Subjects: 
COVID-19
employment
working from home
JEL: 
J2
J6
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
13.11 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.