Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/224936
Authors: 
Gstrein, Oskar Josef
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 9 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 1-17
Abstract: 
Facing the fragmentation of digital space in the aftermath of the Snowden revelations, this article considers regulatory models available to avoid the balkanisation of the internet. Considering government-led surveillance in particular, available strategies are investigated to create a trustworthy and universal digital space, based on human rights principles and values. After analysis and discussion of salient aspects of two relevant proposals, it is submitted that the lack of a common understanding of concepts makes global regulation unlikely. Nevertheless, a possible alternative to universal frameworks and national regulation might be the creation of 'blocs of trust', established through international conventions.
Subjects: 
Internet governance
Surveillance
Jurisdiction
Human rights
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
232.64 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.