Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/224933
Authors: 
Budnitsky, Stanislav
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 9 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 1-25
Abstract: 
Over the past two decades, Russia has championed the primacy of national governments in managing the global internet. Scholars attribute Russia's global internet governance philosophy and practices predominantly to its increasingly authoritarian and illiberal regime under President Vladimir Putin. This article, by contrast, explores how Russian ruling elites' view of Russia as an immutable great power has directed the subsequent Russian governments' pursuit of a state-based multipolar digital order. To illuminate cultural continuities in Russia's approach to global communication governance in the post-Soviet period, I examine its state-centric policymaking initiatives at the International Telecommunication Union and the United Nations in the 1990s.
Subjects: 
Global internet governance
International Telecommunication Union
International information security
National identity
Russia
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
300.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.