Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/224278
Authors: 
Cheng, Zhiming
Wang, Ben Zhe
Jiang, Zhou
Taksa, Lucy
Tani, Massimiliano
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper 672
Abstract: 
We use the panel data from the Building a New Life in Australia survey to examine the relationships between proficiency in English and labour market outcomes among humanitarian migrants. Having better general or speaking skills in English is certainly associated with a higher propensity for participation in the labour force and getting a job. However, we also find that, compared to other domains of English proficiency, such as listening, reading and writing, proficiency in English speaking skills has been the least improved domain for humanitarian migrants’ who have participated in an English training program. Our paper explores the channels leading to these outcomes, finding that self-esteem, self-efficacy and general health partially mediate the relationship between English proficiency and labour force participation. We also find that self-efficacy, general health and indicative serious mental illness partially mediate the relationship between better English proficiency and the chance of getting a job.
Subjects: 
Australia
humanitarian migrant
proficiency in English
labour force participation
employment
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.