Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223947
Authors: 
Andriopoulou, Eirini
Kanavitsa, Eleni
Leventi, Chrysa
Tsakloglou, Panos
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13505
Abstract: 
During the last decade, Greece faced one of the most severe debt crises among developed countries, leading to Economic Adjustment Programs in order to avoid a disorderly default. Public expenditure was cut, tax rates were increased and new taxes were introduced aiming at restoring public finances. Prominent among the latter were recurrent property taxes that were playing a very minor role before the crisis. These taxes helped boosting public revenues but were hugely unpopular. The paper examines in detail their distributional impact and finds that they led to increases in inequality and (relative) poverty. The result is stronger in the case of inequality indices that are relatively more sensitive to changes close to the bottom of the distribution and poverty indices that are sensitive to the distribution of income among the poor.
Subjects: 
property taxation
inequality
poverty
progressivity
Greece
JEL: 
D31
H22
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
365.56 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.