Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223789
Authors: 
Rangel, Marcos A.
Shi, Ying
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13347
Abstract: 
We study racial bias and the persistence of first impressions in the context of education. Teachers who begin their careers in classrooms with large black-white score gaps carry negative views into evaluations of future cohorts of black students. Our evidence is based on novel data on blind evaluations and non-blind public school teacher assessments of fourth and fifth graders in North Carolina. Negative first impressions lead teachers to be significantly less likely to over-rate but not more likely to under-rate black students' math and reading skills relative to their white classmates. Teachers' perceptions are sensitive to the lowest-performing black students in early classrooms, but non-responsive to highest-performing ones. This is consistent with the operation of confirmatory biases. Since teacher expectations can shape grading patterns and sorting into academic tracks as well as students' own beliefs and behaviors, these findings suggest that novice teacher initial experiences may contribute to the persistence of racial gaps in educational achievement and attainment.
Subjects: 
racial bias
first impressions
teachers
racial disparities
JEL: 
I24
J15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
413.55 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.