Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223681
Authors: 
Fraumeni, Barbara M.
Christian, Michael S.
Samuels, Jon D.
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13239
Abstract: 
Over the 1948–2013 period, many factors significantly impacted on human capital, which in turn affected economic growth in the United States. This chapter analyzes these factors within a complete national income accounting system which integrates Jorgenson-Fraumeni human capital into the accounts. By including human capital, a fresh perspective on economic growth across time and within specific subperiods is revealed, notably regarding the 1995–2000 and 2007–2009 periods. During the 1995–2000 period, the reduction in human capital investment significantly reduced apparent economic growth. In the 2007–2009 period, the increase in human capital investment tempered the negative impact of the Great Recession. Over the longer time period, first the post-World War baby boom and then the substantial increase in education led to higher economic growth than otherwise expected. As the pace of increase in education slowed and the workforce aged toward the end of the period, human capital induced growth was reduced.
Subjects: 
human capital
integrated economic accounts
U.S. post-war sources of growth
education
labor force participation
JEL: 
E01
E24
J24
I21
J21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
716.67 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.