Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223678
Authors: 
Bond, Timothy N.
Giuntella, Osea
Lonsky, Jakub
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 13236
Publisher: 
Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
We develop a theoretical framework to analyze the effects of immigration on native job amenities, focusing on work schedules. Immigrants have a comparative advantage in production at, and lower disamenity cost for nighttime work, which leads them to disproportionately choose nighttime employment. Because day and night tasks are imperfect substitutes, the relative price of day tasks increases as their supply becomes relatively more scarce. We provide empirical support for our theory. Native workers in local labor markets that experienced higher rates of immigration are more likely to work day shifts and receive a lower compensating differential for nighttime work.
Subjects: 
night shifts
working conditions
immigration
JEL: 
F22
J61
J31
R13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
279.33 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.