Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223615
Authors: 
Bergin, Adele
Kelly, Elish
Redmond, Paul
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 410v2
Abstract: 
Ireland was hit particularly hard by the global financial crisis, with severe impacts on the labor market. Between 2007 and 2013, the unemployment rate increased dramatically, from 5% to 15.5%, and the labor force participation rate declined by almost five percentage points between 2007 and 2012. Outward migration re-emerged as a safety valve for the Irish economy, helping to moderate impacts on unemployment via a reduction in overall labor supply. As the crisis deepened, long-term unemployment escalated. However, since 2013, there is clear evidence of a recovery in the labor market with unemployment, both overall and long-term, dropping rapidly.
Subjects: 
unemployment
migration
Brexit
Ireland
JEL: 
J1
J8
J21
J60
J64
J68
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.