Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223607
Authors: 
Gathmann, Christina
Monscheuer, Ole
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 125v2
Abstract: 
The perceived lack of economic or social integration by immigrants in their host countries is a key concern in the public debate. Research shows that the option to naturalize has considerable economic and social benefits for eligible immigrants, even in countries with a tradition of restrictive policies. First-generation immigrants who naturalize have higher earnings and more stable jobs. Gains are particularly large for immigrants from poorer countries. Moreover, citizenship encourages additional investment in skills and enables immigrants to postpone marriage and fertility. A key question is: does naturalization promote successful integration or do only those immigrants most willing to integrate actually apply?
Subjects: 
citizenship
economic integration
assimilation
immigration
Europe
JEL: 
F22
K37
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.