Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/223012
Authors: 
Rossouw, Stephanie
Greyling, Talita
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper No. 634
Abstract: 
The pursuit of happiness. What does that mean? Perhaps a more prominent question to ask is, 'how does one know whether people have succeeded in their pursuit'? Survey data, thus far, has served us well in determining where people see themselves on their journey. However, in an everchanging world, one needs high-frequency data instead of data released with significant time-lags. High-frequency data, which stems from Big Data, allows policymakers access to virtually real-time information that can assist in effective decision-making to increase the quality of life for all. Additionally, Big Data collected from, for example, social media platforms give researchers unprecedented insight into human behaviour, allowing significant future predictive powers.
Subjects: 
Happiness
Big Data
Sentiment analysis
JEL: 
C88
I31
I39
J18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.