Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/222169
Authors: 
Hijzen, Alexander
Martins, Pedro S.
Parlevliet, Jante
Year of Publication: 
2019
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Policy [ISSN:] 2193-9004 [Volume:] 9 [Year:] 2019 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 1-26
Abstract: 
Collective bargaining has come under renewed scrutiny, especially in Southern European countries, which rely predominantly on sectoral bargaining supported by administrative extensions of collective agreements. Following the global financial crisis, some of these countries have implemented substantial reforms in the context of adjustment programmes, seen by some as a 'frontal assault' on collective bargaining. This paper compares the recent top-down reforms in Portugal with the more gradual evolution of the system in the Netherlands. While the Dutch bargaining system shares many of the key features that characterise the Portuguese system, it has shown a much greater ability to adjust to new challenges through concerted social dialogue. This paper shows that the recent reforms in Portugal have brought the system more in line with Dutch practices, including in relation to the degree of flexibility in sectoral collective agreements at the worker and firm levels, the criteria for administrative extensions, and the application of retro- and ultra-activity. However, it remains to be seen to what extent the top-down approach taken in Portugal will change bargaining practices, and importantly, the quality of industrial relations.
Subjects: 
collective bargaining
bargaining coverage/structure/coordination
trust
comparative economic systems
JEL: 
D02
JO8
J3
J5
P5
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
388.76 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.