Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/221822
Authors: 
Bjørnskov, Christian
Voigt, Stefan
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
ILE Working Paper Series No. 36
Abstract: 
The COVID-19 pandemic has not only caused thousands to die and millions to lose their jobs, it has also prompted more governments to simultaneously to declare a state of emergency than ever before. States of emergency usually imply the extension of executive powers that diminishes the powers of other branches of government, as well as to the civil liberties of individuals. Here, we analyze whether the use of emergency provisions during the COVID-19 pandemic is an exception, and find that this is not the case. In fact, some measures point at long-term dangers to the rule of law and democracy.
Subjects: 
COVID-19
constitutional emergency provisions
state of emergency
JEL: 
K40
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.