Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/221773
Authors: 
Chiaruttini, Maria Stella
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
IBF Paper Series No. 03-20
Abstract: 
When in 1860 Southern Italy was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy, it suddenly found itself within a larger national market characterised by high levels of public debt, a new currency and increased competition in banking. Monetary problems, the depreciation of public bonds and the loss of pre-eminence of the Southern public banks to the advantage of the Piedmontese National Bank, the predecessor of the Bank of Italy, are increasingly often taken as evidence of the harmful effects of financial integration on the Southern economy. This paper, focusing on the banking side of the story, argues, on the contrary, that the South benefited significantly from its integration with the North and that the relative underdevelopment of its credit markets was not due to a policy of 'internal financial colonialism' pursued by Northern capitalists with the backing of the Italian state, but to different economic conditions and the long-lasting impact of the poor banking policies implemented under the Bourbons.
JEL: 
E50
F36
G21
G28
N23
P51
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
882.41 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.