Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/218856
Authors: 
Fregin, Marie-Christine
Levels, Mark
van der Velden, Rolf
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education [ISSN:] 1469-3623 [Publisher:] Taylor & Francis [Place:] London [Volume:] 50 [Year:] 2020 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 257-275
Abstract: 
This article provides empirical evidence on the relation between institutional characteristics of labour markets that frame allocation processes, and optimal skill matching at the individual level. We investigate the extent to which skill-based job-worker matches are associated with employment protection legislation (EPL), unemployment benefits, and enforcing and enabling activating labour market policies. Drawing on data of the OECD’s Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), and performing cross-country analyses of 28 industrial countries, we find that EPL can explain variance in the share of optimal skill matching across countries, displaying a positive relation. We also find a negative relation between strict enforcing activating labour market policies and optimal skill matching.
Subjects: 
skills
mismatch
allocation
social policy
labour market policy
institutions
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Document Version: 
Published Version

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.