Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/216098
Authors: 
Alipio, Mark
Year of Publication: 
2020
Abstract: 
Drawn on the existing pandemic and potential shift to full e-learning, this study has focused on the descriptive evaluation of readiness for e-learning of higher education students in a less-economically developed country. This is a descriptive online survey employing questionnaires to elicit data on the readiness of students for e-learning. A total of 880 Filipino students responded and provided consent to participate. Ratings were descriptively analyzed using mean, frequency, and percentages. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between each demographic profile and readiness for e-learning. A p-value below 0.05 was considered significant. Of the 880 sample, majority were in the lower middle class and private higher education institution. Most of the respondents answered ‘No’ in all e-learning readiness items. The odds of scoring low in the readiness scale was higher among younger and female respondents. With reference to high income class, the odds of scoring low in the readiness scale was approximately 16.23, 12.02, 5.21, and 1.87 times more likely when students belong to low, lower middle, middle, and upper middle class, respectively. The type of school is not associated with low readiness probability. School officials may first address the lack of digital skills among students and formulate programs that would capacitate them. The possible shift for e-learning should be considered if financial, operational, and Internet connectivity issues of learners in the low-income sector and rural areas are addressed. More strategic planning and quality management mechanisms should be directed towards an equitable and inclusive education without undermining quality learning.
Subjects: 
Coronavirus
COVID-19
Education
E-learning
Less-economically developed country
Philippines
Online education
JEL: 
I10
I18
I23
I28
I30
Additional Information: 
Paper: Impact of COVID-19 on Education
Document Type: 
Research Report
Appears in Collections:






Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.