Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/215397
Authors: 
Nguyen, Ha Trong
Le, Huong Thu
Connelly, Luke B.
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper No. 501
Abstract: 
Recent economic literature has advanced the notion that cognitive biases and behavioural barriers may be important influencers of uptake decisions in respect of public programs that are designed to help disadvantaged people. This paper provides the first evidence on the determinants of uptake of two recent public dental benefit programs for Australian children and adolescents from disadvantaged families. Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative survey linked to administrative data with accurate information on eligibility and uptake, we find that only a third of all eligible families actually claim their benefits. These actual uptake rates are about half of the targeted access rates that were announced for them. We provide new and robust evidence consistent with the idea that cognitive biases and behavioural factors are barriers to uptake. For instance, mothers with worse mental health or riskier lifestyles are much less likely to claim the available benefits for their children. These barriers to uptake are particularly large in magnitude: together they reduce the uptake rate by up to 10 percentage points (or 36%). We also find some indicative evidence about the presence of the lack of information barrier to uptake. The results are robust to a wide range of sensitivity checks, including controlling for possible endogenous sample selection.
Subjects: 
Government Programs
Impact Evaluation
Dental Health
Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
Australia
Uptake
Take-up
JEL: 
D91
H51
I12
I18
I38
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.