Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/215121
Authors: 
Joshi, Heather
Bryson, Alex
Wilkinson, David
Ward, Kelly
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 12725
Abstract: 
Using data tracking all those born in a single week in Great Britain in 1958 through to their mid-50s we observe an inverse U-shaped gender wage gap (GWG) over their life- course: an initial gap in early adulthood widened substantially during childrearing years, affecting earnings in full-time and part-time jobs. In our descriptive approach, education related differences are minor. Gender differences in work experience are the biggest contributor to that part of the gender wage gap we can explain in our models. Family formation primarily affects the GWG through its impact on work experience. Family composition is similar for male and female workers but attracts opposite wage premia. Not all of the GWG however is linked to family formation. There was a sizeable GWG on labour market entry and there are some otherwise unexplained gaps between the pay of men and women who do not become parents.
Subjects: 
family formation
gender wage gap
work experience
life course
NCDS birth cohort
JEL: 
J16
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
693.86 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.