Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21487
Authors: 
Cigno, Alessandro
Rosati, Furio C.
Guarcello, Lorenzo
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 470
Abstract: 
There is no empirical evidence that trade exposure per se increases child labour. As trade theory and household economics lead us to expect, the cross-country evidence seems to indicate that trade reduces or, at worst, has no significant effect on child labour. Consistently with the theory, a comparatively well educated labour force, and active social policies, appear to be conducive to a reduction in child labour. For countries with a largely uneducated workforce, the problem is not so much globalisation, as being allowed to take part in it.
Subjects: 
child labour
globalisation
education
health
skill premium
trade
JEL: 
O15
J24
F12
J13
D13
I20
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
420.84 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.