Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/214864
Authors: 
Bruni, Luigino
Pelligra, Vittorio
Reggiani, Tommaso
Rizzolli, Matteo
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
MUNI ECON Working Paper No. 2019-04
Abstract: 
In mainstream business and economics, prizes such as the Presidential Medal of Freedom are understood as special types of incentives, with the peculiar features of being awarded in public, and of having largely symbolic value. Informed by both historical considerations and philosophical instances, our study defines fundamental theoretical differences between incentives and prizes. The conceptual factors highlighted by our analytical framework are then tested through a laboratory experiment. The experimental exercise aims to analyze how prizes and incentives impact actual individuals’ behavior differently. Our results show that both incentives (monetary and contingent) and prizes (non-monetary and discretional rewards) boost motivation to perform if awarded publicly, but only prizes crowd-in motivation promoting virtuous attitude.
Subjects: 
incentives
prizes
awards
crowding-in
meaning
intrinsic motivation
JEL: 
B1
D03
J33
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.