Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/214066
Authors: 
Ala-Fossi, Marko
Alén-Savikko, Anette
Hilden, Jockum
Horowitz, Minna Aslama
Jääsaari, Johanna
Karppinen, Kari
Lehtisaari, Katja
Nieminen, Hannu
Year of Publication: 
2019
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 8 [Year:] 2019 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 1-17
Abstract: 
Academic debates tend focus on attempts to codify and promote communication rights at the global level. This article provides a model to analyse communication rights at a national level by operationalising four rights: access, availability, dialogical rights, and privacy. It highlights specific cases of digitalisation in Finland, a country with an impressive record as a promoter of internet access and digitalised public services. The article shows how national policy decisions may support economic goals rather than communication rights, and how measures to realise rights by digital means may not always translate into desired outcomes, such as inclusive participation in decision-making.
Subjects: 
Communication rights
Access
Availability
Dialogical rights
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.