Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/214064
Authors: 
Coche, Eugénie
Year of Publication: 
2018
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 7 [Year:] 2018 [Issue:] 4 [Pages:] 1-17
Abstract: 
The purpose of this paper is to explore the risks of privatised enforcement in the field of terrorism propaganda, stemming from the EU Code of conduct on countering illegal hate speech online. By shedding light on this Code, the author argues that implementation of it may undermine the rule of law and give rise to private censorship. In order to outweigh these risks, IT companies should improve their transparency, especially towards users whose content have been affected. Where automated means are used, the companies should always have in place some form of human intervention in order to contextualise posts. At the EU level, the Commission should provide IT companies with clearer guidelines regarding their liability exemption under the e-Commerce Directive. This would help prevent a race-to-the bottom where intermediaries choose to interpret and apply the most stringent national laws in order to secure at utmost their liability. The paper further articulates on the fine line that exists between 'terrorist content' and 'illegal hate speech' and the need for more detailed definitions.
Subjects: 
Code of conduct on countering illegal hate speech online
Privatised enforcement
Illegal hate speech
Terrorism propaganda
Freedom of expression
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.