Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/213998
Authors: 
Radu, Roxana
Chenou, Jean-Marie
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] Internet Policy Review [ISSN:] 2197-6775 [Volume:] 4 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 1-10
Abstract: 
Data control, among the newest forms of power fostered by information and communication technologies (ICTs), triggers a continuous (re)negotiation of public and private orderings, with direct implications on both regulators and intermediaries. This article examines the stance of the European Union (EU) regarding the position of Google - the world's largest internet services company as per its 2014 market value - in two controversial instances: the 'right to be forgotten' and the implementation of EU competition rules. It provides an analysis of these evolving debates and their meaning for EU regulatory thrust more broadly, discussing the shift in the approach to digital markets and the proactive development of a European framework influential beyond continental boundaries.
Subjects: 
Intermediary liability
Regulatory shifts
Digital monopoly
Right to be forgotten
E-commerce
Data protection
Taxation
Antitrust
Privacy
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/legalcode
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.