Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/21372
Authors: 
Black, Sandra E.
Brainerd, Elizabeth
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 556
Abstract: 
While researchers have long held that discrimination cannot endure in an increasingly competitive environment, there has been little work testing this dynamic process. This paper tests the hypothesis (based on Becker 1957) that increased competition resulting from globalization in the 1980s forced employers to reduce costly discrimination against women. The empirical strategy exploits differences in market structure across industries to identify the impact of trade on the gender wage gap: because concentrated industries face little competitive pressure to reduce discrimination, an increase in competition from increased trade should lead to a reduction in the gender wage gap. We compare the change in the residual gender wage gap between 1976 and 1993 in concentrated versus competitive manufacturing industries, using the latter as a control for changes in the gender wage gap that are unrelated to competitive pressures. We find that increased competition through trade did contribute to the relative improvement in female wages in concentrated relative to competitive industries, suggesting that, at least in this sense, trade may benefit women by reducing firms? ability to discriminate.
Subjects: 
gender wage gap
discrimination
JEL: 
J70
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
387.1 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.