Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/211291
Authors: 
Funjika, Patricia
Getachew, Yoseph Yilma
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2019/64
Abstract: 
This paper estimates the relationship between differences in skills measured among within-country ethnic groups and individual human capital accumulation in eight African countries. Our results show that the skills of an individual in these countries depends more on the human capital levels of their parents' ethnic group (ethnic capital) than on parental investment. Therefore, differences in initial levels of ethnic capital may explain the persistence of ethnicitybased differences in educational attainment over time. Birth cohort analysis and the results from an interaction effects model show that ethnic capital has a persistent effect, and that this effect is higher in former British colonies than former French colonies. Using historical religion-based data from the colonial and independence periods as instruments for ethnic capital, we demonstrate large effects of parental ethnicity on an individual's human capital skill level and show that colonial origin may be important in understanding intergenerational mobility in African countries.
Subjects: 
Africa
colonial origin
education
ethnicity
human capital
intergenerational mobility
JEL: 
C21
I24
J62
N37
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
ISBN: 
978-92-9256-698-2
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.