Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/210952
Authors: 
Berggren, Niclas
Bjørnskov, Christian
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
IFN Working Paper 1311
Abstract: 
We ask whether, as many seem to think, corruption worsens, and judicial accountability improves, inequality, and investigate this empirically using data from 145 countries 1960.2014. We relate perceived corruption and de facto judicial accountability to gross-income inequality and consumption inequality. The study shows that corruption is negatively, and that judicial accountability is positively, related to both types of inequality. The estimates are particularly pronounced in democracies and arguably causal, as we find that the full effect only occurs after institutional stability has been established; The findings suggest that "unfair procedures" - corruption and deviations from judicial accountability - may benefit the economically worst off and worsen the situation of the economic elite.
Subjects: 
Corruption
Inequality
Institutions
Accountability
Rent-seeking
JEL: 
C31
D02
D31
D72
D73
E26
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
392.15 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.