Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/209780
Authors: 
Akram, Q. Farooq
Year of Publication: 
2000
Series/Report no.: 
Arbeidsnotat No. 2000/7
Abstract: 
Despite the emerging consensus on the validity of purchasing power parity (PPP) between trading countries in the long run, empirical evidence in favour of the PPP theory is scarce in data predominantly exposed to real shocks. This paper tests for PPP between Norway and its trading partners using quarterly observations from the post Bretton Woods period, in which the Norwegian economy has been exposed to numerous real shocks such as frequent revaluations of oil and gas resources through new discoveries and price fluctuations. The paper undertakes an extensive examination of the behaviour of the Norwegian real and nominal exchange rates and shows that it is remarkably consistent with the PPP theory. Moreover, convergence towards the equilibrium level appears relatively fast; our estimate of the half life of a deviation from the equilibrium level is just six quarters. This is partly attributed to the Norwegian government's policies aimed at preserving the competitiveness of the economy and the system of centralized wage bargaining.
Subjects: 
PPP
purchasing power parity
Dutch disease
real exchange rate
oil prices
centralised wage bargaining
exchange rate policy
cointegration analysis
JEL: 
C22
C32
C51
E31
E31
E58
F41
J51
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
ISBN: 
82-7553-164-0
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.no
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.