Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/209569
Authors: 
Connolly, Marie
Corak, Miles
Haeck, Catherine
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Research Group on Human Capital - Working Papers Series 19-02
Abstract: 
Intergenerational income mobility is lower in the United States than in Canada, but varies significantly within each country. Our sub-national analysis finds that the national border only partially distinguishes the close to one thousand regions we analyze within these two countries. The Canada-US border divides Central and Eastern Canada from the Great Lakes regions and the Northeast of the United States. At the same time some Canadian regions have more in common with the low mobility southern parts of the United States than with the rest of Canada, and the fact that these areas represent a much larger fraction of the American population also explains why mobility is lower in the United States.
Subjects: 
intergenerational mobility
equality of opportunity
geography
JEL: 
D63
J61
J62
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.19 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.