Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20833
Authors: 
Strobl, Eric
Thornton, Robert
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 660
Abstract: 
Using comparable data sets for five African countries we estimate, and evaluate possible explanations for, the employer size wage effect across these. Our results indicate, just as has been generally found for other developing and developed nations, that apart from observable worker characteristics most potential theories cannot explain very much of the wage premium received in larger firms. Moreover, we find that the employer size wage effect does not differ greatly across the five African countries. Like other developing nations it is, however, larger than that found in the industrialised world, and, unlike the industrialised world, larger for white than blue collar workers. Additionally, data for one of the African countries in conjunction with other tentative evidence suggests that this may in part be because skill biased technology affects the firm size wage distribution across skill groups in developing countries more.
Subjects: 
employer size wage effect
Cameroon
Ghana
Kenya
Zambia
Zimbabwe
JEL: 
J3
O1
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
569.88 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.