Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/208046
Authors: 
Grewenig, Elisabeth
Lergetporer, Philipp
Werner, Katharina
Woessmann, Ludger
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper No. 146
Abstract: 
A large literature studies subjective beliefs about economic facts using unincentivized survey questions. We devise randomized experiments in a representative online survey to investigate whether incentivizing belief accuracy affects stated beliefs about average earnings by professional degree and average public school spending. Incentive provision does not impact earnings beliefs, but improves school-spending beliefs. Response patterns suggest that the latter effect likely reflects increased online-search activity. Consistently, an experiment that just encourages search-engine usage produces very similar results. Another experiment provides no evidence of experimenter-demand effects. Overall, results suggest that incentive provision does not reduce bias in our survey-based belief measures.
Subjects: 
beliefs
incentives
online search
survey experiment
JEL: 
D83
C83
C90
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.