Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/207642
Authors: 
Schmidt, Robert J.
Schwieren, Christiane
Sproten, Alec N.
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series 666
Abstract: 
Using coordination games, we study whether social norm perception differs between inexperienced and experienced participants in economic laboratory experiments. We find substantial differences between the two groups, both regarding injunctive and descriptive social norms in the context of participation in lab experiments. By contrast, social norm perception for the context of daily life does not differ between the two groups. We therefore conclude that learning through experience is more important than selection effects for understanding differences between the two groups. We also conduct exploratory analyses on the relation between lab and field norms and find that behaving unsocial in an experiment is considered substantially more appropriate than in daily life. This appears inconsistent with the hypothesis that social preferences measured in lab experiments are inflated and indicates a distinction between revealed social preferences as measured commonly and the elicitation of normatively appropriate behavior.
Subjects: 
laboratory experiments
learning
selection effects
generalizability
methodology
JEL: 
B40
C90
C91
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
505.75 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.