Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/207110
Authors: 
Nepal, Apsara Karki
Halla, Martin
Stillman, Steven
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper No. 1815
Abstract: 
We show that the exposure to war-related violence increases the quantity of children temporarily, with permanent negative consequences for the quality of the current and previous cohorts. Our empirical evidence is based on Nepal, which experienced a ten year long civil conflict of varying intensity. We exploit that villages affected by the conflict had the same trend in fertility as non-affected villages prior to the onset of conflict and employ a difference-in-differences estimator. We find that women in affected villages increased their actual and desired fertility during the conflict by 22 percent, while child height-for-age declined by 11 to 13 percent. Supporting evidence suggests that the temporary fertility increase was the main pathway leading to reduced child height, as opposed to direct impacts of the conflict.
Subjects: 
Conflict
violence
quantity-quality model of fertility
height-for-age
Nepal
JEL: 
D74
H56
J13
O10
O12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
583.73 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.