Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/207088
Authors: 
Stutzer, Alois
Baltensperger, Michael
Meier, Armando N.
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
WWZ Working Paper No. 2018/25
Abstract: 
We study how the number of ballot propositions affects the quality of decision making in direct democracy, as reflected in citizens' knowledge, voting behavior, and attitudes toward democracy. Using three comprehensive data sets from Switzerland with over 3,500 propositions, we exploit variation in the number of federal propositions and plausibly exogenous variation in the number of cantonal propositions. Only with a relatively high number of propositions on the ballot do voters have less knowledge about federal propositions. Otherwise, we find no indication that the number of ballot propositions impedes the quality of decision making in direct democracy. For instance, a higher number of propositions does not lead more voters to support proposals endorsed by pole parties. If anything, having more federal propositions on the ballot relates to higher perceived political influence and satisfaction with democracy.
Subjects: 
ballot length
direct democracy
pole-party endorsements
political knowledge
satisfaction with democracy
turnout
voter behavior
JEL: 
D03
D72
D78
H00
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.