Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/206405
Authors: 
Neyt, Brecht
Baert, Stijn
Vynckier, Jana
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper 422
Abstract: 
Research exploiting data on classic (offline) couple formation has confirmed predictions from evolutionary psychology in a sense that males attach more value to attractiveness and women attach more value to earnings potential. We examine whether these human partner preferences survive in a context of fewer search and social frictions. We do this by means of a field experiment on the mobile dating app Tinder, which takes a central place in contemporary couple formation. Thirty-two fictitious Tinder profiles that randomly differ in job status and job prestige are evaluated by 4,800 other, real users. We find that both males and females do not use job status or job prestige as a determinant of whom to show initial interest in on Tinder. However, we do see evidence that, after this initial phase, males less frequently begin a conversation with females when those females are unemployed but also then do not care about the particular job prestige of employed females.
Subjects: 
job prestige
partner preferences
dating apps
online dating
Tinder
JEL: 
J12
J16
J13
C93
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.