Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/205638
Authors: 
Law, David
Meehan, Lisa
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
New Zealand Treasury Working Paper No. 13/14
Publisher: 
New Zealand Government, The Treasury, Wellington
Abstract: 
Housing affordability has been a topic of much interest in New Zealand over recent years with the median house price increasing by over 50% between 2004 and 2008. The aim of this paper is to inform debate by drawing out evidence from two surveys: the Household Economic Survey (HES); and the Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE). In particular, the paper examines how patterns of house prices, expenditures, and home ownership have changed over time and across groups. A model which may be suggestive of whether or not an individual or couple is likely to find home-ownership affordable is also developed. This model incorporates information relating to four important influences of affordability: income; net wealth; house prices; and the structure of mortgage contracts (including the interest rate and mortgage term).
Subjects: 
Housing Affordability
House Prices
Homeownership
Housing Expenditures
Rent
Mortgage Payments
JEL: 
R21
R31
R32
ISBN: 
978-0-478-40353-4
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
585.47 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.