Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20532
Authors: 
Fertig, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 1266
Abstract: 
The German practice of compelling weak students to repeat a class has come under heavy criticism recently. Many observers fear that this practice is, at best, useless or even counterproductive. However, little is known so far on the consequences of having to repeat a class, as compared to be confronted with new course material in the next class. This paper, therefore, aims at generating empirical evidence on the effect of class repetition on individual educational attainment. Since an experimental study is precluded, we utilize an instrumental variable approach to control for unobserved heterogeneity between respondents. Our estimation results suggest that there exists a negative association between repeating a class and educational attainment. However, taking unobserved heterogeneity into account yields a statistically significant and quantitatively substantial positive effect of class repetition on educational outcomes.
Subjects: 
schooling degree
instrumental variables estimation
JEL: 
I21
J13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
175.28 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.