Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/205296
Authors: 
Bonfatti, Roberto
Gu, Yuan
Poelhekke, Steven
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper No. TI 2019-006/VIII
Abstract: 
Africa's interior-to-coast roads are well suited to export natural resources, but not to support regional trade. Are they the optimal response to geography and comparative advantage, or the result of suboptimal political distortions? We investigate the political determinants of road paving in West Africa across the 1965-2012 period. Controlling for geography and the endogeneity of democratization, we show that autocracies tend to connect natural resource deposits to ports, while the networks expanded in a less interior-to-coast way in periods of democracy. This result suggests that Africa's interior-to-coast roads are at least in part the result of suboptimal political distortions.Africa's interior-to-coast roads are well suited to export natural resources, but not to support regional trade. Are they the optimal response to geography and comparative advantage, or the result of suboptimal political distortions? We investigate the political determinants of road paving in West Africa across the 1965-2012 period. Controlling for geography and the endogeneity of democratization, we show that autocracies tend to connect natural resource deposits to ports, while the networks expanded in a less interior-to-coast way in periods of democracy. This result suggests that Africa's interior-to-coast roads are at least in part the result of suboptimal political distortions.
Subjects: 
political economy
democracy
infrastructure
natural resources
development
JEL: 
P16
P26
D72
H54
O18
Q32
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
7.83 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.