Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/204310
Authors: 
Andersen, Laura Mørch
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
FOI Working Paper 2010/5
Abstract: 
Using a unique data set where an unbalanced panel of more than 1,000 households have reported their purchases of groceries in great detail over a period of six months it is shown that consumption of organic milk increases significantly with level of education, urbanisation and income. Age and presence of children in the household have no significant effects. Combining the purchase data with a questionnaire about attitudes towards organic production issued to the same panel shows that 51 per cent believes that organic production has a positive effect on the environment and 41 per cent believes in a positive effect on their own health. The level of trust in organic products generally increases with level of education, urbanisation and income. Including perception of organic goods in the estimation therefore reduces the effects of these socio-demographics, and thereby demonstrates the strength of this type of data combination. It turns out that both trusts in effect on environment and on health increases the probability of choosing organic milk significantly. The effect of trust in health is more than twice as big as the effect of trust in environment.
Subjects: 
panel mixed multinomial logit
labelling
characteristics model
health
environment
organic
JEL: 
Q51
Q13
D12
C25
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.