Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/203430
Authors: 
Castells-Quintana, David
McDermott, Thomas K. J.
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
ADB Economics Working Paper Series 588
Abstract: 
In this paper, we test the effect of weather shocks and floods on urban social disorder for a panel of large cities in developing countries. We focus on a particular mechanism, namely the displacement of population into (large) cities. We test this hypothesis using a novel dataset on floods−distinguishing those that affected large cities directly from those that occurred outside of our sample of large cities. Floods are found to be associated with faster growth of the population in the city, and in turn with a higher likelihood (and frequency) of urban social disorder events. Our evidence suggests that the effects of floods on urban social disorder occur (mainly) through the displacement of population, and the "push" of people into large cities. Our findings have important implications for evaluating future climate change, as well as for policies regarding adaptation to climate change and disaster resilience.
Subjects: 
climate change
conflict
floods
migration
rainfall
social disorder
urbanization
JEL: 
D90
I30
J60
O10
Q00
Q01
Q50
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
363.62 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.