Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/202891
Authors: 
Pichler, Stefan
Ziebarth, Nicolas
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 18-293
Abstract: 
This paper exploits temporal and spatial variation in the implementation of nine-city- and four state-level U.S. sick pay mandates to assess their labor market consequences. We use the synthetic control group method and traditional difference-in-differences models along with the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages to estimate the causal effects of mandated sick pay on employment and wages. We do not find much evidence that employment or wages were significantly affected by the mandates that typically allow employees to earn one hour of paid sick leave per work week, up to seven days per year. Employment decreases of 2 percent lie outside the 92 percent confidence interval and wage decreases of 3 percent lie outside the 95 percent confidence interval.
Subjects: 
sick pay mandates
sick leave
medical leave
employer mandates
employment
wages
synthetic control group method (SCGM)
Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW0, United States (U.S.)
JEL: 
I12
I13
I18
J22
J28
J32
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.