Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20252
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJacobson, Louisen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaLonde, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Daniel G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T16:12:45Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T16:12:45Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/20252-
dc.description.abstractStudies show that high-tenure displaced workers typically incur substantial long-termearnings losses. As these losses have become increasingly apparent, policy makers havesignificantly expanded resources for retraining, much of which takes place in regularcommunity college classes. To analyze the effectiveness of such training, we linkadministrative earnings records with the community college transcript records of workersdisplaced from jobs during the first half of the 1990s in Washington State. We explore severalissues of statistical specification for regression models quantifying the impact of communitycollege credits on earnings. These include (i) how to allow for a transition period immediatelyafter the end of workers? schooling when their earnings may be temporarily depressed, (ii)whether earnings gains are strictly proportional to credits earned, and (iii) how to modelworker-specific unobserved heterogeneity. In our preferred specification, we find that theequivalent of an academic year of community college schooling raises the long-term earningsof displaced workers by an average of about 9 percent for men and about 13 percent forwomen. However, these average returns mask substantial variation in the returns associatedwith different types of courses. On the one hand, we estimate that an academic year of moretechnically oriented vocational and academic math and science courses raise earnings byabout 14 percent for men and 29 percent for women. On the other hand, we estimate thatless technically oriented courses yield very low and possibly zero returns. About one third ofthe increase in earnings associated with more technically oriented vocational and academicmath and science courses is estimated to be due to increases in wage rates, with theremainder attributable to increased hours of work.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion paper series |x1017en_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordunemploymenten_US
dc.subject.keywordtrainingen_US
dc.subject.keywordschoolingen_US
dc.subject.keywordevaluationen_US
dc.subject.stwKündigungen_US
dc.subject.stwWeiterbildungen_US
dc.subject.stwUmschulungen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsertragen_US
dc.subject.stwWashingtonen_US
dc.subject.stwVereinigte Staatenen_US
dc.titleEstimating the Returns to Community College Schooling for Displaced Workersen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn378960245en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
355.04 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.