Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/202470
Authors: 
Ramsay Bush, Georgia
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers 2018-04
Abstract: 
This paper examines how the 1990s capital account liberalization policy trend affected international capital flows, and tests a new hypothesis that the depth and efficiency of the domestic financial system impacts the efficacy of capital account policy. The paper exploits a recently published IMF database on financial development that spans the period 1980-2014 and includes both developing and developed countries. The results confirm that policy on average does not have a significant effect on gross capital flows, when controlling for other factors. I also find no effect on flows disaggregated by type and direction. However, interacting capital account policy and financial development, I do find that for financially developed countries, policy has the expected effect - policy openness leads to capital flows. The implication is that the effectiveness of capital account liberalization requires developing the domestic financial system.
Subjects: 
financial globalization
financial integration
financial development
capital flows
capital control measures
JEL: 
F3
F4
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
486.78 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.