Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20213
Authors: 
Corak, Miles
Lipps, Garth
Zhao, John
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 977
Abstract: 
The relationship between family income and post-secondary participation is studied in order to determine the extent to which higher education in Canada has increasingly become the domain of students from well-to-do families. An analysis of two separate data sets suggests that individuals from higher income families are much more likely to attend university, but this has been a long-standing tendency and the participation gap between students from the highest and lowest income families has in fact narrowed. The relationship between family income and post-secondary participation did become stronger during the early to mid 1990s, but weakened thereafter. This pattern reflects the fact that policy changes increasing the maximum amount of a student loan as well as increases in other forms of support occurred only after tuition fees had already started increasing.
Subjects: 
university
educational finance
intergenerational mobility
JEL: 
J62
I2
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
432.55 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.