Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Frijters, Paul
Shields, Michael A.
Price, Stephen Wheatley
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 902
Most immigrant groups experience higher rates of unemployment than the host countries native population, but it is as yet unclear whether differences in job search behaviour, or its success, can help explain this gap. In this paper, we investigate how the job search methods of unemployed immigrants compare with those of the native born, using panel data from the UK Quarterly Labour Force Survey. We explore the relative effectiveness of different job search methods, between the main native born and immigrant groups, in terms of their impact on the duration of unemployment. Our main finding is that immigrant job search in the UK is less successful than that of UK born whites. However their relative failure to exit unemployment cannot generally be explained by differences in the choice of main job search method or in observable characteristics. We find no support for a policy that would constrain immigrants to use verifiable job search methods.
job search
duration analysis
panel data
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
333.99 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.